A Review – Dark Currents: Agent of Hel by Jacqueline Carey

I’ve seen worse paperback cover art, too.

Jacqueline Carey is my favourite author in the epic fantasy genre; not only because the setting of her Phèdre series is unique, complicated and lacking Tolkienian cliché, but also because the characters are full and believable. So, when I heard that she was branching into my favourite genre, urban fantasy, I felt equal parts excited and apprehensive.

Being the first in a new series, Dark Currents: Agent of Hel has the unenviable task of introducing characters, locations, conflicts and an internal supernatural logic along with telling its own story. As with the beginning of any “genre” series, it must do all of these things with enough strength to sustain its successors. This is where many authors fall down – particularly in urban fantasy.

While Carey’s first novel – Kushiel’s Dart (my review of which can be found here) – was equal parts criticised and applauded for its in-depth world building, Dark Currents drip-feeds us information as the story progresses, allowing us to really get in on the action even in chapter one. The main character, Daisy, is perfectly poised between the magical and mundane to present information on either when the situation arises.

Of course (and at the risk of losing the rest of your day on TV Tropes), there is a certain element of “our monsters are different“. Each species has to be not only introduced, but also seen in action in order to make Carey’s modern monsters distinct from those on the same book store shelf. Nonetheless, this is done with care and is not overly distracting. There isn’t too much contrast with popular culture, for example.

As a caveat to that point, though, I have to admit a little smirk at the “offensive term” for the vampire nest being “Twilight Manor”.

The mystery is gripping enough that even without the supernatural elements it could make a compelling crime novel in its own right. As an element that many urban fantasy writers neglect, I found it rather pleasing that I was mentally working on the puzzle on the few occasions I wasn’t reading.

I found the mix of Christian and Norse mythology to be compelling, though the interaction between the two is not deeply explored. After the atypical theology of her Kushiel series, I would have preferred an approach more from further outside the box, as many supernatural series (including Supernatural) feel the need to use Abrahamic religion as a baseline. Nonetheless, there’s enough non-Christian stuff to sink my teeth into, and I’m sure Carey will address it more in future books, considering her protagonist’s back story.

As an introductory novel, it works well, and I’m sure it will go from strength the strength as the series progresses. It isn’t a stand-out of the genre in the same way I consider Kushiel’s Dart to be, but it is certainly deserving of a place beside Butcher, Hamilton and Harris. If this is your genre, do add Dark Currents: Agent of Hel to your collection.

(The same review on Goodreads is here)

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30 Day Challenge: Day 1

Hello, WordPress. It’s been a while, hasn’t it? Sorry about that. I’ve had a very interesting and complicated Summer sans Internet. Maybe I’ll talk about it as part of this thing I’ve decided to do:

Completely stolen from a lovely lady who blogs over here. I figured it’d be a good way to get back into writing and blogging without having a big, long emo-post. So, here we go.

30 Days Challenge:

Day 1: 5 interesting facts about yourself.
Day 2: The meaning behind your name.
Day 3: About your friends.
Day 4: About your family.
Day 5: A photo of something you really hate.
Day 6: A song that makes you cry.
Day 7: Your crush.
Day 8: Something you hate about yourself.
Day 9: Your definition of love.
Day 10: Your best friend.
Day 11: A letter to one of your exes.
Day 12: Your favorite female group.
Day 13: Your least favorite female group.
Day 14: Something you love about yourself.
Day 15: What you would if you were pregnant or got someone pregnant.
Day 16: A photo that makes you smile.
Day 17: A photo that makes you want to cry.
Day 18: A letter to someone you miss.
Day 19: A habit you wish you didn’t have.
Day 20: A letter to your parents.
Day 21: Short goals you wish to fulfill by the end of the month.
Day 22: Your nicknames & why you have them.
Day 23: What you would find in your bag.
Day 24: A song that makes you smile.
Day 25: How you found out about blogger & why you made one.
Day 26: First 10 songs to play on shuffle on your iPod.
Day 27: Your fashion style.
Day 28: What attracts you to someone.
Day 29: Future plans/goals.
Day 30: Who are you?

I’ll try to do this every day, but I know me. I probably won’t. Anyway:

Day 1: 5 interesting facts about yourself.

Well, here’s the one I usually keep in reserve for questions like this and drunken nights out:

I. I have been in a romantic relationship that included three other people. I won’t go into all the ins and outs of how it works. Here’s the Internet oracle if you’re curious. The basic philosophy of poly is that anything goes so long as it’s open and agreed upon beforehand.

I was 22 and just out of a 6-year relationship. I had this friend who I’d had a sneaky little crush1 on for years, and after an overly self-indulgent mourning period, stuff started to happen between us.

When it became apparent than it was a less-than-casual relationship, I was introduced to her slightly scary husband and eventually his girlfriend. Now, if you think things are dramatic in a relationship with two emotionally unpredictable people, just try it with 4.

Although I do believe that with the right mix of people with the right attitudes, it is a relationship model that can work, I’m not sure if I would ever do it again. Ultimately, my self-worth was torn up pretty badly by that whole experience, and I’m not eager to repeat it.

Let’s move on to something a little more cheerful, shall we?

II.  I’m writing my first novel. It is taking years as I tend to dip into it around procrastination, work and relationship drama.

It’s a story about a girl2, Laura, who is just coming out of a shitty relationship – the latest in a long line. Not too long after (following an inadvisable nightclub dalliance), she finds herself dating her boss, George, who she’s had a crush on for all the years she’s been working at his magazine. Unfortunately, things take a turn for a worse, as it seems that he’s involved in a violent power struggle with creatures that just aren’t really real. Right? And even then, Laura’s journo-sense tells her that there’s still more to George than meets the eye…

I’ve always wanted to write, and my dissertation was around the evolution of vampires in modern fiction (pre-Twilight, thankyouverymuch). I want to see one book with my name on it before I die. It’s the one ambition and dream I always come back to. It’s slow going, but I’m making it happen.

III. I don’t really understand hetero-normative men. Not even a little.

That isn’t to say I don’t have the same drives or desires as your typical hombre. Quite the reverse. Nonetheless, ever since I was a little boy I’ve felt very much apart from the strongly-masculine, football-loving, beer-swilling stereotypes I was exposed to. I’ve always had female friends while being completely baffled by representatives of my own sex.

I get a lot of pleasure from romantic comedies. If you say please, I’ll let you laugh at my “Rainy Tuesday” guilty pleasure movie.

I react to things (everything) with emotion. Where society perhaps suggests that a man should react in anger or aggression, I’ll react in sadness and half a chocolate cheesecake. It has led to my being “friendzoned” or taking the “gay friend” role in the life of some wonderful women, but then I have some amazing friends. You win some, you lose some.

It’s just the way I am, really. That amongst other things make me not quite fit in the little mining town I was born into, and so I travel. Which leads me to…

IV. I’m an Englishman in Mexico teaching English to Mexicans.

At the risk of being too navel-gazy about it, I think I’m running away from the very settled, local life that my brother and family still enjoy. Much as I love my family, I get terribly claustrophobic in that environment. I wanted to experience things, go places, meet people and have the kind of life I’ve read about in books. So I am. I’ve always had an affinity for words and language, so this is how I chose to do it.

Eventually, I want to have kids who have a life that is incomparable to their grandparents’. I want my grandchildren to do more still. I want my life to have made an impression on the world, even if it’s just an ant’s footprint.

V: I’m a geek. It’s perhaps not the most interesting thing to put into one of these, but it’s a huge identifier in who I am. On any given evening I will be procrastinating from housework, paid work or novel work with any one of the following:

Video games, science-fiction and fantasy anything, comic books, comic book movies, book-books, roleplaying (given an English-speaking geek community), blogging (hi!), watching YouTube videos about the above, Supernatural, The Big Bang Theory, posting on forums, Doctor Who, LARP, card games, board games, anything with Felicia Day in it… the list goes on.

Meddlers

This fact comes with this extra bonus fact: I used to be really fat.

I didn’t set out to be geeky, but when I hit university, I tried all  the things that seemed cool to me and kept doing them. I don’t really care that they’re not mainstream, or even that some are. I pretty much bumble along doing what I enjoy, making mistakes and hoping for the best. Hell, it’s why I’m sitting on my bed in Latin America rather than getting ready to go to my call centre job in South Yorkshire. Plans are for wimps. 😉

I hope you feel enlightened by all this. Comments welcome. Tune in again tomorrow!

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1 Although I say “sneaky little crush,” I am aware that subtlety and emotional guardedness are not weapons I hold in my arsenal. It’s was almost certainly common knowledge long before anything happened.
2 See Fact III.

Iron Sky and Trollhunter (Trolljegeren): Both Worth Watching

This weekend, I watched a couple of foreign films. I realise that’s not a genre, but it seemed  enough of a category to group them together in one post. The first was Iron Sky:Iron Sky

The Nazis are back – and this time they’re sexy!

Iron Sky is the most ridiculous movie I’ve seen in quite a long time. Nazis escaped to the moon and live a 1940s cartoon lifestyle on the dark side, where they can’t be found. It’s not explained how, given all the 40s tech they still use, they managed to get there in the first place. Not least get up there unnoticed.

The president of the United States is a… okay. She’s Sarah Palin. She’s a no-nonsense Republican with a moose head on her wall, a snappy wardrobe of power-suits and an overriding sense of American privilege. She is also represented as Hitler in a scene dragged straight from Downfall.

The actual Hitler figure in this movie is Udo Kier, who I still struggle to see as anything but “king of the wampires”. He plays a completely irredeemable villain, as does his sex-starved successor, Götz Otto. The Führer is dead, long live the Führer!

Let me list a few of the silly things that happen in Iron Sky:

  • An Alfred Einstein wannabe bleaches a black guy white
  • Zeppelins in space
  •  A swastika-shaped HQ
  • The president’s aid climbing on board a space ship dressed as Maleficant
  • North Korea is laughed into silence during a UN meeting

A big Michael Jackson fan. And a hot Nazi. And another dude.

This is a very silly movie, although the final scene struck a few realistic chords. Quote:

Americans: You you all gave me your word!

UN: But you broke yours!

America: We always break ours. That’s just what we do!

And:

” [Found resource]

America: That’s ours.

UN: Boo

America: Here me out. The moon is American soil. Moon flag: Stars and Stripes…”

So… yeah. Space Nazis and America-bashing. What more of a review do you need? Also, if anyone has Ms. Julia Dietze‘s phone number…

Next up, and made with a slightly more serious tone, was Trolljegeren (Troll Hunter).

Now, at the beginning of this movie you expect something like The Blair Witch Project or Paranormal Activity. The shaky cam is shaky, there are woods and a premise for them having a camera (chasing bear poachers). We chase a shady-looking guy (a Norwegian comedian who I thought looked a little like Michael Gambon) and, twenty-minutes into the movie, during the first shaky-cam scare, we see a troll in full night vision. No hiding behind things or shaky cameras. He’s just… there. At first I was disappointed. Jon Landis has always said that he wished he’d shown less  of the wolf in his seminal An American Werewolf in London.

That said, though, the tone of the film changes completely. Rather than a thing out to scare us with glimpses of poorly-shot monster, we’re now on what seems to be a real-life hunt. We are confronted by the troll-related bureaucrats trying to cover things up, and the cheerful Polish immigrants they employ to do so. The troll hunter is miserable and rebellious, while the film-makers go from cynical outsiders to his ignorant allies. The trolls are often quite cute, and look a lot like the traditional images of Norwegian folk law.

Particular highlights include shots of the beautiful Northern European landscape, the sometimes tear-jerkings stories of the troll hunter himself, and the sense that if you sing hymns loud enough in deepest, darkest Norway you might just get eaten.

The movie develops an intriguing back story, makes a few barbs at Norwegian administration and allows us to see that vampires aren’t the only ones who still have that Hollywood magic.

One depressing piece of news, that I don’t entirely understand, is that an American production company have bought the rights to remake it. Now, I’m not a movie snob, but I don’t see why it needs to be made. Troll hunter is perfectly watchable to an English-speaker. Sure, most of the dialogue is in Norwegian, but surely that adds to the authenticity of the “found footage” model? I will see the remake, if it ever happens, but I honestly don’t see it being better than this charming, heart-wrenching and beautifully shot original.

 

Final thought: